fbpx

Lizards in Arvada, CO

Bearded Dragon Care Instructions

Heat:

Bearded dragons live in the arid desert and need a good amount of heat. Like most reptiles, bearded dragons regulate their body temperature based on the temperature in their environment. For this reason, it is important to create a temperature gradient throughout the tank. One side of the tank should be a hotter “basking spot,” with temperatures of 100-110°F below the heat lamp. The opposite side of the tank should be cooler, with a temperature of 80-90°F. A ceramic heat bulb will help keep your dragon warm without disrupting the sleep schedule because it does not emit light. A digital thermometer or infrared gun (Amazon.com) is the most accurate way to measure the cage’s temperature. This should always be measured at the level where your dragon will spend the most time. Avoid using heat rocks as they are known to cause terrible burns in reptiles.

Lighting:

Bearded dragons require UVB light, which is important to activate and maintain vitamin D and calcium levels. A lack of UVB light could lead to metabolic bone disease. Full spectrum fluorescent lights or mercury vapor lights are readily available at most pet stores and will supply the needed ultraviolet light. It is generally recommended to place the light between 12 and 18-inches above your dragon. If the light is more than 18-inches away, it will not be effective, while lights closer than 8-inches can cause “sunburn.” Please change UV lights every six months, since the lights will stop producing UV rays before they stop emitting visible light. A 12-hour light/dark cycle is appropriate.

Enclosure:

An aquarium of at least 40 gallons is recommended for one adult bearded dragon, since the enclosure should be at least 3 times the length of the adult lizard. You can add a screen lid that will prevent contact with hot lamps or bulbs. Remember not to use glass under any UVB lights, since the glass will filter the light and prevent the UVB rays from reaching your dragon. An ideal substrate is something easy to clean and safe for your pet. Caution should be used with sand, mulch, bark and gravel as they could be ingested and cause intestinal blockage.

Humidity:

The humidity should be kept between 30-40%. A digital hygrometer should be used to measure the humidity in your dragon’s enclosure. Some ways to increase humidity include spraying water multiple times per day or purchasing an automatic mister. A shallow dish big enough for your dragon to fit in should be placed in the middle of the tank. This will allow your reptile to soak and drink water. Change the water at least daily or more often if soiled. Additionally,you can give your dragon a warm soaking bath for 15-20 minutes a few times per week to increase hydration. The water should be between warm for the entire soak.

Enrichment:

In order for your dragon to feel safe at home, it is recommended to place at least two hiding spots, one on each side of the terrarium. Anything where your pet fits should be ok, from a box to commercial rock caves.

Monitoring:

Please watch for lethargy, inappetence, bloody stools, or any other signs of illness. Feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns.

Diet:

Bearded dragons are omnivorous, meaning they can eat plant matter and animal matter (insects).  Your dragon should get a salad comprised of mixed greens and vegetables either everyday or every other day. This should represent the majority of the overall diet. Leafy greens such as radicchio, arugula, dandelion, mint, watercress, endive, parsley, basil, cilantro and leaf lettuces may comprise the salad. Vegetables such as pumpkin, acorn squash, sweet potatoes and snap peas can be offered as well. Please limit spinach, kale, mustards, collards, turnip greens, and chard as they may prevent calcium absorption and can lead to metabolic bone disease. Avoid avocado and rhubarb as they are toxic to your dragon.

 One to two servings of protein per week should be enough for adult dragons. Wax worms, meal worms, super worms, crickets and cockroaches are all examples of insects that your dragon can eat (3-5 insects per serving).“Gut-load” insects by feeding a calcium-rich diet for at least 24-48 hours prior to feeding out to ensure the insect’s digestive tract is full of calcium. Some common brand names of gut-loading products are: Mazuri Better Bugs and Fluker’s High Calcium Cricket Diet.

Sprinkling a calcium-only supplement on the salad and insects just prior to feeding would be ideal. The calcium powder should not contain added vitamin D or excess phosphorus, as your reptile should be receiving enough vitamin D via UVB exposure and enough phosphorus by eating insects.

Leopard Gecko Care Instructions

Enclosure:

A single gecko should be housed in a 30-gallon or 20-gallon long aquarium with small limbs for climbing. Please avoid using sand and particulate (ground walnut shells, corn cob, alfalfa) as substrate, as it can be ingested by your gecko and cause impaction. Paper towel, artificial turf, coconut fiber are preferred substrates. A hide box filled with moist moss or coconut fiber is needed, so your gecko can shed its skin properly.

The enclosure should be spot checked daily for feces. Spoiled or wet areas should be removed right away to prevent bacterial or fungal growth. The enclosure substrate should be completely changed and disinfected with a 5% diluted bleach solution on a regular basis. Avoid cleaners such as Lysol or Pine-Sol as this can leave a toxic residue. Rinse the enclosure thoroughly with water after cleaning and allow to air dry before placing your pet back inside.

Please monitor your pet’s appetite, weight, and behavior, and contact us if you notice any changes.

Lighting:

Although crepuscular (most active during dawn/dusk), leopard geckos can benefit from short duration UVB exposure. Two hours per day, one hour at 6 AM and another hour at 6 PM (to mimic their crepuscular exposure pattern) can be beneficial. Exo Terra UVB 100 is a good option of bulb. Please make sure to place the bulb at an appropriate distance from your gecko. UVB bulbs usually need to be changed every 6 months. Please visit exoterra.com (or the link below) for more information. “http://www.exo-terra.com/en/explore/uv_rating_index.php

Adequate UVB exposure is important to guarantee your pet will be able to produce healthy quantities of Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is produced when the skin is exposed to UVB. Vitamin D3 is responsible for adequate calcium absorption from the intestine. It might seem like a good idea to supplement your pet with oral Vitamin D3. However, if given in excess, Vitamin D3 can cause serious, life threating disease. That is why Vitamin D3 should not be given orally. Instead, just expose your pet to adequate UVB light, and your pet’s body will only produce the correct amount of Vitamin D3 necessary to absorb calcium from the diet.

Diet:

Please offer a variety of invertebrates to your pet, such as dubia roaches, crickets, superworms, hornworms, phoenix worms every other day. Variety is the key! All invertebrates must be first given a nutritious diet. Repashy Bug Burger is a good option. A different, richer food source should be given to the invertebrates for at least 24-48 hours before being fed to your pet. This is called gut-loading. A good gut loading formula is Repashy Superload.

Some invertebrates, which might not feed on the powder formulas, might need to be offered vegetables and green leaves instead. Please dust the invertebrates with calcium carbonate only (no vitamin D3) 3-4 times a week. Repashy Super Cal No D is a great option. A shallow water dish with fresh water must be available at all times and should be changed daily.

Heat:

Please make sure to provide a warm area of approximately 80-90°F during the day, dropping 5-10°F during the night. The best way to heat your gecko is by using an under-tank heating pad or tape. Heating one end of the cage is best, to allow for a temperature gradient of 10°F. Heat rocks are not recommended as they might cause burns. The temperature should be measured using a thermometer or an infrared thermal gun.

Chameleon Care Instructions

Enclosure:

Chameleons should be housed in a well-ventilated enclosure. Please avoid glass terrariums. Screened terrariums provide a superior enclosure. Chameleons should be provided with plenty of furniture options for climbing and hiding. Artificial plants, logs and branches are a great option.

Please provide water with a dripping system, and make sure the humidity in the enclosure is appropriate (65-80%), by using a misting system. The misting system should be set to go off every 1-2 hours for 5-15 minutes at a time. Chameleons depend on water droplets to drink. You will rarely see them drink water from a bowl.

It might seem like a good idea to supplement your pet with oral vitamin D3. However, if given in excess, vitamin D3 can cause serious, life threatening disease. That is why vitamin D3 should not be given orally. Instead, just expose your pet to adequate UVB light, and your pet’s body will only produce the correct amount of vitamin D3 necessary to absorb calcium from the diet.

Lighting:

Please make sure your pet has access to direct sun light (not through a window) daily, or at minimum 4 times a week for 1 hour. In addition, please make sure to place an UVB bulb in your pet’s enclosure, near the heat source. Exoterra UVB 100 (placed at an appropriate distance from animal) is a good option. Bulbs usually need to be changed every 6 months. Please visit http://www.exoterra.com/en/explore/uv_rating_index.php for more information.

Adequate UVB exposure is important to guarantee your pet will be able to produce healthy quantities of vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is produced when the skin is exposed to UVB. Vitamin D3 is responsible for adequate calcium absorption from the intestine. That is why is so important that your pet is exposed to direct sun light daily. Glass windows unfortunately filter the UVB waves. Indirect sunlight exposure through a window is not efficacious.  Although a convenient option, UVB bulbs are not as good as direct sun light but should be used if direct sunlight is not an option, or to supplement short duration direct sunlight exposure.

Heat:

Please make sure to provide a basking area of approximately 85-95°F during the day, dropping 10°F during the night. Ceramic heating lamps are a great option. The temperature should be measured using a thermometer or an infrared thermometer gun.

Special Instructions:

Please monitor your pet’s appetite, weight, and behavior, and contact us if you notice any changes.

Diet:

Please offer a variety of invertebrates to your chameleon, such as dubia roaches, crickets, superworms, hornworms, phoenix worms every other day. Variety is the key! All invertebrates must be first given a nutritious diet. Repashy Bug Burger is a good option. A different, richer food source should be given to the invertebrates for at least 24-48 hours before being fed to your pet. This is called gut-loading. A good gut loading formula is Repashy Superload.

Some invertebrates, which might not feed on the powder formulas, might need to be offered vegetables and green leaves instead. Please dust the invertebrates with calcium carbonate only (no vitamin D3) 3-4 times a week. Repashy Super Cal No D is a great option.

Get the best care for your best friend.

Save time and request an appointment online
Skip to content